NIH Library About Us Announcements NIH Library Classes: November - December 2014

NIH Library Classes: November - December 2014

Let the NIH Library help you improve your searching and reference management skills.

Classes are free, hands-on, open to NIH and HHS staff, and are held in the NIH Library Training Room, Building 10 Clinical Center, near the South Entrance.

Registration is required for all classes. To register, click the desired course title below. Please note the course descriptions at the bottom of the page.

***New Class Registration Process: Registration for NIH Library classes is managed by CIT using the HHS Learning Management System. Please log into this system before proceeding to register for classes. For assistance with registration, please contact CIT at 301.594.6248 or CITTraining@mail.nih.gov.

If you are unable to attend a class, consider requesting an individual tutorial. Please note that not all classes are available tutorials. Contact the NIH Library Instruction Team if your desired class is not listed.

We look forward to seeing you!


November
  3: 2 - 2:30 pm​ NIH Library Technology Sandbox Orientation
  4: 1 - 2 pm​ EndNote Web: Using EndNote from Anywhere (Webinar)
  4: 2 - 3 pm​ BTRIS Basics for Clinical Researchers - Retrieving and Reporting Data for Active Protocols
  5: 2 - 3 pm​ Working with Geospatial Data (Webinar)
  6: 12 - 1 pm​ Using Web of Science and Scopus in Bibliometric Analysis
  7: 11 - 12 pm​ 3D Printing at the NIH Library Orientation
10: 10 - 11:30 am​ EndNote: Managing Your Search Results
12: 10 - 11:30 am​ Introduction to Systematic Reviews
13: 10 - 11 am​ What the Impact Factor Can and Cannot Measure
17: 10 - 11:30 am​ PubMed: Understanding the Basics
18: 10 - 11 am​ 3D Printing at the NIH Library Orientation
19: 1 - 2:30 pm​ Preservation, Retention, and Storage of Digital Data: The Proper Care and Feeding of Research Data
20: 12 - 1 pm​ An Effective Bioinformatic Quality Control Method for Next-Generation Sequencing Data Analysis (Seminar)
21: 10 - 11:30 am​ Finding and Reusing Scientific Research Data (Webinar)


December
  1: 10 - 11 am​ 3D Printing at the NIH Library Orientation
  2: 1 - 2 pm​ BTRIS Intermediate - Report Options, Optimizing Searches, Filtering Data
  2: 3 - 4 pm​ Exploring the Possible Responses of Cellular Signaling Pathways through Computational Modeling (Seminar)
  3: 10 - 11:30 am​ Preservation, Retention, and Storage of Digital Data: The Proper Care and Feeding of Research Data (Webinar)
  4: 9 - 4 pm​ GeneSpring 12.6.1
  5: 9:30 am - 5 pm​ Introduction to R and RStudio
  9: 10 - 11:30 am​ EndNote: Managing Your Search Results
  9: 3 - 4:30 pm​ Research Data Description and Organization (Webinar)
10 & 11: 1 - 5 pm​ Golden Helix "SNP and Variation Suite" (SVS) and VarSeq
11: 10 - 11 am​ Embase for Biomedical Searching - An Introduction
16: 10 - 12 pm​ Human Gene Mutation Database and Genome Trax
18: 11 - 12 pm​ 3D Printing at the NIH Library Orientation
18: 1 - 3 pm​ PubMed: Understanding the Basics
19: 9:30 am - 5 pm​ Introduction to R and RStudio
31: 10 - 11 pm​ 3D Printing at the NIH Library Orientation

 

Course Descriptions

NOTE: Not every course is taught each quater. Course dates are listed above.

3D Printing at the NIH Library
Learn how to operate a Makerbot Replicator 2 3D printer. From June 2 to August 29 the NIH Library is piloting a free 3D printing service to offer NIH staff the opportunity to explore this technology and to assess the need for this type of service at NIH. The printer is self-service and is available during Library open hours. Prior to printing, users are required to learn how to use the printer during this 30-minute orientation. Orientations are held weekly. NOTE: This orientation does not cover 3D modeling.

Agilent GeneSpring 12.6.1
GeneSpring 12.6 provides comprehensive analytical and visualization tools for multiple data types within a single application. With the NIH Library license, gene expression (microarray), miRNA, QPCR, exon splicing, CNV, and GWAS can be combined into one project, allowing researchers to analyze and view results from different experiments in a single user interface. One can link probes across data types, array platforms, and organisms that map to the same biological entity. GeneSpring includes a wide range of biological contextualization tools including GO, GSEA/GSA, and Pathway analysis with interaction databases for over 20 model organisms. The NIH Library has two floating licenses (http://nihlibrary.nih.gov/Services/Bioinformatics/Pages/bioanalysis.aspx) for GeneSpring. This class covers the functionatlity of GeneSpring available with this license. Additionally, the Library holds a static license for GeneSpring 12. This program is located on NIH Library Bioinformatics Workstation 3 (64-bit architecture, 8 cores, 48GB RAM, and 2TB disk space). For reservations, please visit the NIH Library Information Desk or call 301-496-1080.

Copyright and Plagiarism: for NIH Authors
NIH employees make presentations about their research as well as publish about it in journal articles, book chapters, or books. To enhance audience engagement, NIH authors often choose to use cartoons, illustrations, photographs, figures, and tables. In this class, you will learn how to reduce the risk of copyright infringement and plagiarism when using artwork or writing that is not your own.

Designing Maps for a Health Study Webinar (Webinar)
With many biomedical researchers now making their datasets publicly available, the answers to your research questions might be right at your fingertips. This class will introduce attendees to resources for finding existing research datasets that can address their hypotheses. Attendees will learn how to use Google Refine, a free, open-source tool, to prepare datasets for analysis and re-use. Methods for appropriately citing and acknowledging reused datasets will also be discussed.

Embase for Biomedical Searching - An Introduction
This class will introduce core EMBASE features and strategies for comprehensive searching. With over 24 million indexed records and more than 7,600 currently indexed peer-reviewed journals, Embase is a highly versatile, multipurpose and up-to-date database covering the most important international biomedical literature from 1947 to the present. The core strengths of Embase include: coverage and in-depth indexing of the drugrelated and clinical literature with a particular focus on comprehensive indexing of adverse drug reactions, emphasis on Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) indexing including systematic reviews, and coverage and indexing of journals and articles relevant to the development and use of medical devices.

EndNote: Managing Your Search Results
EndNote© is a reference management tool for finding, downloading and organizing references in a personal, searchable database. With EndNote you can import references from online databases such as PubMed and Web of Science; search for and edit references; insert references in manuscripts with Microsoft® Word "Cite While You Write;" create bibliographies; and choose from thousands of journal publishing styles to format references and bibliographies.

EndNote: Managing Your Search Results (Webinar)
This online webinar is a great way to learn about EndNote without leaving your desk. EndNote is a reference management tool for finding, downloading and organizing references in a personal, searchable database. With EndNote you can import references from online databases such as PubMed and Web of Science; automatically retrieve article PDFs; search for and edit references; insert references in manuscripts with Microsoft Word's Cite While You Write; create bibliographies; and choose from thousands of journal publishing styles to format references and bibliographies. Note about this class: This class will be offered remotely via Adobe Connect and will cover EndNote for Windows. Connecting to the Online Class: Information about connecting to the Webinar will be sent to registered users one week before the start of the Webinar.

EndNote Web: Using EndNote from Anywhere (Webinar)
EndNote Web is a web-based research and writing tool and a perfect complement to EndNote and Reference Manager. Add, transfer or import your references to EndNote Web and access your account via any web browser. Use "Cite While You Write" from EndNote Web to format your in-text citations and bibliography. If you do not have access to EndNote, than try EndNote Web - it is another great tool in your researcher toolbox! This resource is available for free to NIH/HHS staff via the Web of Science database on the NIH Library website.

Expression Data Analysis on Microarray and NGS in Partek®
Two-day workshop offering hands-on training on Partek Genomics Suite (PGS), software that is designed to support next generation sequencing (NGS), microarray and qPCR data analysis.

Finding and Reusing Scientific Research Data
With many biomedical researchers now making their datasets publicly available, the answers to your research questions might be right at your fingertips. This class will introduce attendees to resources for finding existing research datasets that can address their hypotheses. Attendees will learn how to use Google Refine, a free, open-source tool, to prepare datasets for analysis and re-use. Methods for appropriately citing and acknowledging reused datasets will also be discussed.

Golden Helix "SNP and Variation Suite (SVS)" and VarSeq
Golden Helix SNP & Variation Suite (SVS) empowers biologists and other researchers to perform complex analyses and visualizations of multifaceted genomic and phenotypic data using a set of analytic tools, including SNP Analysis, CNV Analysis, DNA-Seq Analysis, and RNA-Seq Analysis. VarSeq™ software streamlines the process of annotating and filtering variants obtained from next generation sequencing pipelines to find variants of interest. VarSeq simplifies the user interface and provides a scalable architecture featuring repeatable workflows, note taking and reporting, and filter parameter prototyping.

Human Gene Mutation Database and Genome Trax
Got mutations? HGMD® Professional provides comprehensive data on human inherited disease mutations. It’s compilation of structured, manually curated data from the peer-reviewed literature enables quick access to both single mutation queries and advanced search applications. Genome Trax™ is a data analysis tool which works with HGMD® and other data sources to enable scientists to identify human genome variations of functional significance by mapping their NGS data to known elements such as disease mutations and regulatory sites.

Impact Assessment for Authors
Individual authors are increasingly being asked to demonstrate the impact of their published research using various citation-based metrics like the H-Index. Although such metrics have significant limitations, when used properly they can assist in the evaluation of individual authors for promotion, tenure, and green card applications. In this session, you will gain an understanding of how these metrics are calculated, why certain metrics like the Journal Impact Factor should not be used to evaluate an author’s work, and how to obtain appropriate citation metrics for yourself.

Introduction to Data Management (Webinar)
As science becomes increasingly data-intensive and new policies require sharing of research data, investigators need to be aware of how they can most effectively manage their data. This course will provide an introduction to best practices in data management applicable to almost all types of digital data, spanning the entire research life cycle, from before a project starts to after it ends. Attendees will learn techniques to make their data more useful to themselves and their team, enhance their ability to share their data, and increase citations to their research.

Introduction to Systematic Reviews
This class provides an overview of systematic reviews and outlines the tools used to manage data associated with a systematic review. Using the PRISMA framework as a guide, this class will cover each step of the systematic review process. Basic concepts will be reinforced using examples from medicine, public health, and social work.

Introduction to the BTRIS Limited Data Set Applications
The BTRIS Limited Data Set application allows researchers to access data from across all active and terminated protocols conducted within the NIH intramural program. Access clinical research data from 1976 to the present across 480,000 subjects to pose hypotheses and generate new research ideas! Questions? contact BTRIS Support at BTRISSupport@nih.gov.

NIH Library Technology Sandbox Orientation
The Technology Sandbox is a new space in the NIH Library (in Building 10) designed to highlight NIH technology-based projects, to encourage exploration of emerging technologies, and to facilitate meaningful partnerships between the Library and its customers---NIH staff. This orientation will provide an overview of Technology Sandbox services related to 3D printing, graphic design and geographic information systems (GIS), mobile devices, and data sciences.

Preservation, Retention, and Storage of Digital Data: The Proper Care and Feeding of Research Data
You’ve collected and analyzed your data, presented your findings, and published your paper, but your work isn’t over quite yet! Even once you’ve published your results, you still need to take steps to manage and safeguard your data. Proper storage and preservation of your data is important to ensure that your data can be re-used by you and other researchers, meet legal and institutional requirements for retention, and even protect against allegations of scientific misconduct. In this class, you’ll learn how to ensure your data remains accessible and well-maintained. We’ll cover: the basics of electronic record retention policy; how to "future-proof" your data; and when and how to submit to a data repository.

PubMed: Understanding the Basics
Use PubMed to find articles on your research topic in biomedical and scientific journals. PubMed is the National Library of Medicine's premier bibliographic database covering the fields of medicine and preclinical sciences, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine and the health care system. It includes journal article citations and abstracts from MEDLINE and other sources. Many of the citations lead to full-text articles available online through NIH Library subscription agreements.

R and RStudio
R is a popular, free, open-source software and language for statistics, data analysis, and visualization. The R software is available for nearly every operating system including Mac, Windows, and Linux. Because it is command-line driven, it lends itself to reproducible research. This one-day hands-on session will introduce students to interacting with R, finding help, loading and manipulating data, and basic plotting functionality. Previous limited programming experience will be quite helpful but not necessary.

Research Data Description and Organization: Metadata, Common Data Elements, Taxonomies, and More
This class will highlight the capabilities and features of each product. Much of the utility of these products is in the eye of the beholder and will satisfy different information requirements to different degrees. Learn how to use both databases to search for articles and how to use both to track citations and analyze.Unless you’re working all alone and never publish your results, chances are good that someone besides you will eventually look at your data. When they do, will they understand what your data means, how you collected it, and what your abbreviations and shorthand signify? Make your data easier for others to understand (and for you to work with) by learning how to gather metadata and use shared vocabularies. In this class, you'll learn simple techniques for describing your data including: finding and using specialized metadata standards; adapting or creating a metadata schema to describe your unique data; and use taxonomies, ontologies, and controlled vocabularies to ensure consistency in your description.

Research Data Description and Organization (Webinar)
Unless you’re working all alone and never publish your results, chances are good that someone besides you will eventually look at your data. When they do, will they understand what your data means, how you collected it, and what your abbreviations and shorthand signify? Make your data easier for others to understand (and for you to work with) by learning how to gather metadata and use shared vocabularies. In this class, you’ll learn simple techniques for describing your data, including: finding and using specialized metadata standards, adapting or creating a metadata schema to describe your unique data, and use taxonomies, ontologies, and controlled vocabularies to ensure consistency in your description.

Scopus: Understanding the Basics
Scopus is an interdisciplinary, bibliographic database that indexes the contents of more than 21,000 journals in the physical sciences, engineering, earth and environmental sciences, life and health sciences, social sciences, psychology, business, and management. Scopus includes MEDLINE citations and covers 20,000 journals, 500 conference proceedings, trade publications, 23 million patents, and more than 430 million scientific web pages.This class will show how to use this resource to find and analyze work by a specific author, in a specific field, or associated with a grant.

Using Web of Science and Scopus in Bibliometric Analysis
Introduction to methods of assessing individual and organizational publication performance, with emphasis on citation analysis. Course will demonstrate methods to explore how bibliographical data might be analyzed and retrieved using Web of Science and Scopus.

Visualizing Health Data with ArcGIS Desktop (Webinar)
This webinar will provide an overview of visualizing health data, with a focus on mapping health information in ArcGIS Desktop. Through case examples, the instructor will illustrate how to make maps and analyze geographic patterns in health data.

What the Impact Factor Can and Cannot Measure
Since the Impact Factor was introduced in the mid-1960s, it has become one of the most common, and most controversial, bibliometric indicators currently available. Although it was designed for a very specific purpose, to evaluate journals for inclusion in a scientific database, it has subsequently been used for a wide variety of applications, often without regard for what it can and cannot measure. In this session, you will learn how the Impact Factor is calculated, how that calculation can sometimes lead to biased results, and why it should not be used to evaluate individual articles published in a particular journal.

Working with Geospatial Data
This webinar will provide an overview of downloading, preparing, and working with geospatial data, in ArcGIS. By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: describe how to download data from the U.S. Census Bureau, demonstrate how to prepare census tables for use in mapping, create query to join tabular data to boundary map layers, design a map for the analysis of elevated lead levels.


The NIH Library in Building 10 serves the information needs of NIH staff and selected Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) agencies. The NIH Library is part of the Office of Research Services (ORS) in the Office of the Director (OD).